Sticker from Kahala in Barcelona

WIPP: Final Two Items Revealed

The What In Polynesian Pop game comes to its exciting conclusion, as diablo successfully identifies Item 7. That leaves only Item 4, which is a rather slippery fish, so I’m going ahead and revealing it. You can click each item below to see the answers.

Item 1
Item 1
Item 2
Item 2
Item 3
Item 3
Item 4
Item 4
Item 5
Item 5
Item 6
Item 6
Item 7
Item 7
Item 8
Item 8
Item 9
Item 9

The last two items, Item 4 and Item 7, are revealed today:

Sticker from Kahala in Barcelona
Sticker from Kahala in Barcelona
Item 7
Item 7

Item 7 is a sticker from Kahala, in Barcelona, and was correctly identified by diablo. He actually said it was a Kahala menu, but the two look identical when cropped in like that, so it would have been impossible for him to know it was the sticker instead. I got this sticker as a gift from King Kukulele when I was at one of his Tiki Taix events last year. I have it stuck on my ukulele case, but it keeps falling off, I need to glue it down.

Maori Souvenir Tiki by Ruihana
Maori Souvenir Tiki
by Ruihana
Item 4
Item 4

Nobody guessed Item 4, which isn’t a surprise — I was kind of a stinker to include it, or at least to crop it so close. It’s a souvenir Maori tiki, carved by Ruihana, an artists’ collective in Rotorua, New Zealand. I picked it up at an antiques mall in Pasadena. The green item in his hand is a paddle, but I like to think it’s a lime, and he’s getting ready to mix up some Mai Tais. I think he’s absolutely gorgeous; despite his diminutive size (it’s only 9″ tall) and common provenance, it’s easily one of my very favorite tikis.

Thank you so much to everyone who took a guess at the items — I hope you had as much fun with it as I did.

3 thoughts on “WIPP: Final Two Items Revealed

  1. Kia Ora,

    I am writing in regards to the carving by Ruihana. He was my grand father and I am currently discovering his work is very much spread throughout the world. And they are very beautiful pieces of work. It makes me really emotional when I do see these things and it makes me miss him very much because me, myself – actually do not own anything that he has made. I would also like to clarify what this Tekoteko (not Tiki) is holding. It is called a Mere. These were clubs used in war as a weapon. The reason why it is green is because they were traditionally made with Māori Greenstone called Pounamu.
    This tekoteko depicts a traditional Māori warrior.

    Like

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